Lupus Australia, Queensland Inc

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Lupus Australia, Queensland Inc

Dr D Bossingham rheumatologist from Cairns will be down to speak on Saturday 8th March 2014 between 2-4pm at the Community hall, 60 Stamford Road Indooroopilly

'A lifetime of Lupus' is the subject, so bring along your questions and all who are interested in learning more about Lupus.

Doctor is kindly giving his time to share his years of experience with us so don't miss this chance    Please book on 3878 9553 or 0411 263 733 sms

 

 

 

Our next meeting will be held on the Saturdays as listed below:-

September 21 - Pharmacists from Wesley Pharmacy  
September 28 - Podiatrist and Nutritionist
October 12 - Guests
November 16 - Guests

Time: 2 to 4pm
Venue: Community Hall, 60 Stamford Road, Indooroopilly

Please feel free to attend the meetings. Cheers! :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Updates

Why are new lupus drugs needed?

What should lupus patients and their families know about Benlysta? WebMD consulted Eric L. Gredinger, MD, chief of rheumatism and immunology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, FDA briefing documents, and the FDA approval announcement.

 

Officially know as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), lupus ia an autoimmune disease. It's relatively common, affecting about one in 1,000 people. But some people with lupus have such mild disease they may never know they have it.

Others have relatively mild disease that can be controlled with current treatments. These include over-the-counter NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, corticosteroids such as prednisone, antimalaria drugs such as hydroxychloroquine, powerful immunosuppressants, and cancer chemotherapies. (Lupus is not caused by malaria and is not a cancer, but malarial drugs and chemotherapies suppress various manifestations of lupus).

Still other patients experience frequent lupus flare-ups and suffer devastating side effects from current treatments. And finally, there are patients with life-threatening lupus, at risk of major organ failure.

In all those cases, the current drugs while not perfect provide a good series of choices,” Greidinger says.

Patients with mild disease may not need treatment, or may be able to keep their symptoms under control with relatively safe antimalaria drugs.

Patients with the most severe disease – including lupus affecting the kidneys or brain – can benefit from more aggressive treatment.

But patients in the middle category are more difficult to treat, Greidinger says. They may not get relief from the safest lupus treatments. But stronger treatments, continued over time, may cause side effects that are worse than a patient's symptoms.

 

 

 

Lupus Booklet


A nineteen page booklet filled with stories and poems written by people who have lupus

Including a foreword written by Dr Carola G Vinuesa and Dr Matthew Cook, research scientists who are looking at the causes of lupus.

Contact us if you are interested in purchasing this interesting little book


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